Tuesday, 25 August 2015

Mega Marble Rye











You are going to need a humongous loaf pan for this monster loaf.  Mine is a 3 litre capacity pan that I bought from a specialist baking store years ago and it was only just big enough. If you don't have a loaf pan that looks like it belongs in the land of the giants, you can shape your loaf and bake it straight on a baking sheet. Either way, you'll feel like you're in an episode of The Flintstones when you put it on the table and start slicing.



Mega Marble Rye
slightly adapted from here

For the Light Layers:
75g (1/2 cup) rye flour
560g (4 1/2 cups) baker's flour
1 1/2 teaspoons fine sea salt
2 teaspoons (1 sachet) instant dry yeast
1 1/2 teaspoons caraway seeds
300ml (1 1/4 cups) lukewarm water, plus a little extra if needed
1 tablespoon golden syrup
2 tablespoons olive oil, plus extra for greasing


For the Dark Layers:
75g (1/2 cup) rye flour
560g (4 1/2 cups) baker's flour
1 1/2 teaspoons fine sea salt
2 teaspoons (1 sachet) instant dry yeast
1 1/2 teaspoons caraway seeds
300ml (1 1/4 cups) lukewarm water, plus a little extra if needed
1 tablespoon black treacle
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons cocoa powder
A few drops of brown food colouring (optional)
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted for glazing

Make the Light Dough:
In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the rye flour, baker's flour, salt, yeast and caraway seeds.  Add the water, golden syrup and oil and mix on low speed for about 8 minutes.  Add a little more water if needed.  This should be a smooth, soft dough.  Put the dough into a lightly oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap and set aside to double in size, about 2 hours.

Make the Dark Dough:
In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the rye flour, baker's flour, salt, yeast, caraway seeds and cocoa powder.  Add the water, treacle, oil and food colouring of using, and mix on low speed for about 8 minutes.  Add a little more water if needed. This should be a smooth, soft dough.  Put the dough into a lightly oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap and set aside to double in size, about 2 hours.

Shape the Loaf: 
Grease a large loaf pan with olive oil or line a baking sheet with baking paper.

Cut each portion of dough into two even pieces. You should have two light dough balls and two dark dough balls. Shape the portions into balls and put them on two baking paper lined baking sheets. Cover with clean cloths and leave to rest for 20 minutes.

Take one of the light dough balls and roll it out on a lightly floured work surface until it is about 1cm thick, shaping it into a rough rectangle as you go. Take one of the dark dough balls and roll it out until it is also a 1cm thick rough rectangle. Lay it on top of the light dough rectangle. Continue rolling and layering the dough until you have four layers of alternate colours.

Roll the dough lengthways until it is a log shape.  Put the log, seam-side down into the prepared pan or baking sheet and cover loosely with a clean cloth. Leave to rise until doubled in size, about an hour.

Preheat the oven to 180C (350F).  Make three deep slashes in the top of the loaf and bake for 45 minutes.  Turn the dough out onto a wire rack to cool completely before brushing the top with melted butter.

4 comments:

  1. Daaammmnnn, that's a big loaf of bread!! I don't have a pan big enough, I'm sure of that! But it simply just look so good!! It's been a long time since I made homemade bread. With the summer and my job, I wasn't into it but now I am :)

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  2. Now thats a wonderful loaf!!! Made me smile :) Jan x

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  3. Jennifer, you are the Bread Queen, the Dough Whisperer, the Yeast Beast! You coax beauty and variety out of the most ancient and sacred of foods. I bow down to your awesomeness. Can I come and live in your kitchen cupboard?

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  4. Flintstone sandwiches. Now THAT is one awesome party idea. Love the marbled effect, kinda makes me feel like I'm a kid eating marble cake, but in a much healthier format. Super cool (the massive lip that formed from the pan overflow makes this bread even more fun. Love loaves with character!)

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